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alaina:

Probably [the most challenging piece I designed] was the hotel’s local newspaper, the Trans-Alpine Yodel (above), as there were so many issues with so many different stories, and each one had to be typeset with new articles and weather reports and dates. It was the first piece I worked on with Wes when I arrived in Germany, so this was the prop that I cut my teeth on. I really got a feeling for his fastidiousness on this one - we must have gone through almost 40 different page layouts until he was happy to shoot it! I also had to think about the aspect ratios he was shooting, too, as they were different for the different time periods in the movie, and he wanted the newspaper columns to fit nicely within the frame of each of them. Wes wrote all the newspaper articles himself - not just articles to accompany the main headlines, but the surrounding ones too. On screen, you only get a chance to read the headlines, of course, but the stories are so Wes and so funny. I think he had fun with this one.

Designing for The Grand Budapest Hotel,  an interview with Annie Atkins

Posted 1 hour ago

crispysix50design:

As expected Wes Anderson’s new film The Grand Budapest Hotel is a visually arresting cinematic experience. A highlight of the film is all of the handmade graphic elements ranging from title screens to perfume bottles. Check out this awesome interview with Annie Atkins, the chief graphic designer for the film http://www.nylonmag.com/articles/the-grand-budapest-hotel-graphic-design-annie-atkins

Posted 1 hour ago

getyourasi-on:

Annie Atkins: designing for the Grand Budapest Hotel
via: creativereview

getyourasi-on:

Annie Atkins: designing for the Grand Budapest Hotel

via: creativereview

captainsunbeam:

Annie Atkins:

Last year I spent a very snowy winter on the German-Polish border, as the lead graphic designer on Wes Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel. Working with Wes and his production designer Adam Stockhausen, we created all the graphic props and set-pieces for the State of Zubrowka – a fictitious European country set between the Wars. After we finished shooting I came back to Dublin and worked remotely with Wes on the poster and the titles.

Posted 1 hour ago

(Source: odetofemininity)

varnishisapowerfulliquid:

The Real Art Handler…

varnishisapowerfulliquid:

The Real Art Handler…

mymovieyourmovie:

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

mymovieyourmovie:

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

upgraders:

unclefather:

this is what our tax dollars pay for

good

upgraders:

unclefather:

this is what our tax dollars pay for

good

(Source: ruinlion)

designed-for-life:

Because polyurethane paint becomes all but useless after it is mixed with its reactive components, every day huge amounts of it are simply discarded, ending up in dumps. An Israeli product designer decided to put all this wasted paint to use in his home country and in doing so has developed methods for collecting and processing it to create beautiful objects and furniture - while of course doing the environment a huge favour!

Read More

Posted 3 hours ago


Roger Fenton, “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” (1855)
A depiction of absence during the Crimean War, Roger Fenton’s iconic photograph shows an empty landscape filled with death objects (cannonballs) that ask the viewer to consider how these cannonballs got there and what their presence replaced. 
In Regarding The Pain of Others, Susan Sontag describes the way “canonical images,” such as this one, have been tampered with in order to create a greater affect. As she claims, the first shot of this photograph had more cannonballs on the left, but Fenton then scattered the weapons to create a new documentation of historical loss. To what degree does this alter the “moral authority” of images depicting atrocity? Fenton has altered the already absent landscape, and his taking of the photograph allows him to claim the scene as his own. With this artistic authorship in mind, does Fenton’s altering really alter our perception of the losses suffered? 
If left untouched, the scene itself would have changed and eroded. Human manipulation only contributes to the lack of human experience felt in the image. A photograph is thought to capture a moment in time; but as time progresses, perceptions of images change. How many of us today think about the Chimean War? I doubt very many, but this image represents that it happened—that human life was there—and that human life was lost. And that loss coincides with the idea Sontag attributes to staged war photography: “a lost art.”

Roger Fenton, “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” (1855)

A depiction of absence during the Crimean War, Roger Fenton’s iconic photograph shows an empty landscape filled with death objects (cannonballs) that ask the viewer to consider how these cannonballs got there and what their presence replaced. 

In Regarding The Pain of Others, Susan Sontag describes the way “canonical images,” such as this one, have been tampered with in order to create a greater affect. As she claims, the first shot of this photograph had more cannonballs on the left, but Fenton then scattered the weapons to create a new documentation of historical loss. To what degree does this alter the “moral authority” of images depicting atrocity? Fenton has altered the already absent landscape, and his taking of the photograph allows him to claim the scene as his own. With this artistic authorship in mind, does Fenton’s altering really alter our perception of the losses suffered? 

If left untouched, the scene itself would have changed and eroded. Human manipulation only contributes to the lack of human experience felt in the image. A photograph is thought to capture a moment in time; but as time progresses, perceptions of images change. How many of us today think about the Chimean War? I doubt very many, but this image represents that it happened—that human life was there—and that human life was lost. And that loss coincides with the idea Sontag attributes to staged war photography: “a lost art.”

(Source: notpetermurphy)

duoyen:

And it is not necessarily better to be moved. Sentimentality, notoriously, is entirely compatible with a taste for brutality and worse. (Recall the canonical example of the Auschwitz commandant returning home in the evening, embracing his wife and children, and sitting at the piano to play some…

Posted 14 hours ago

nvvt:

ana kraš

nvvt:

ana kraš

(Source: primordia)

smoochums:

women grow hair on their boobs and their butts and their legs and their arms and their stomachs and their face and really anywhere their genetics decides to have hair and it is perfectly normal what isnt normal is men who have never touched a razor trying to shame women for not looking like a hairless baby

Posted 14 hours ago